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Introducing the Sockettier 

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How and Why?

Sockettier: Organize and use multiple socket sets, regardless of brand or shape. Size matters when you're wrenching!

Years ago, I was in my garage, installing a lift kit on my Chevy Colorado.

I had to keep rolling out, getting up, getting another socket, use it, rinse and repeat. I had multiple socket sets, each with missing sockets, and I got pissed. I said to myself "There HAS to be a better way, I'll just go buy one!"

So I rolled out, washed my hands, and went to the internet, the one source for every kind of product. I wanted a way to keep multiple socket sets organized, and it didn't exist. WTF? Seriously??

So I set out on a quest with my best bud Jose to make one. And we did.

Features

  1. Organize by size. When wrenching, size matters! Not brand, not shape, not direction. Throw it on the rod and be done with it!
  2. Any socket with a hole in the middle will work. 
  3. Color code the rods if desired to match existing socket color, use tape on colorless ones.
  4. Designed for 10mm to 23mm. Other sizes are seldom used, and just get in the way.
  5. No extra stuff to clutter up the intended purpose: to wrench on your project!
  6. Rollable to fit in your toolbox, and carry without worrying about the case falling open, and giving yourself another project: hide and seek with sockets.
  7. Magnets to keep things in line.
  8. Won't scratch your rig, so plop it anywhere, feel safe.
  9. Designed to be droppable, because things get crazy when you're wrenching!
  10. Strong - Double ply 1000 Denier Cordura Nylon: strongest fabric available without adding Kevlar.
  11. Basic - Easy to source materials, so replacements can be bought at a local hardware store.

I personally prefer to buy things Made In The USA.

The Sockettier is pretty basic. We can make additions later, but yeah, it's basic. Here's where I source my materials:

  • 1000 Denier Cordura Nylon - Purchased from New York Tarp & Company out of NY

  • Threaded Rod - Purchased from Grainger out of IL

  • Coupler - Purchased from Tanner Bolt out of NY

  • Machine screw - Purchased from Tanner Bolt out of NY

  • Labels - Custom printed in AZ

  • Neodymium magnets - Purchased from SuperMagnetMan out of AL

Prototypes

The initial premise was to make this thing indestructible. I can't tell you how many socket organizers I've destroyed over the years because they were made out of cheap plastic!! We only want to sell you one, and hopefully never wear it out.

v0.01 - Very first prototype. Yep, rods work, need different spacing for large sockets

v0.01 - Very first prototype. Yep, rods work, need different spacing for large sockets

v0.02 - Solid steel cylinder, tapped for rod, cut to different widths to accommodate different sized sockets. Way too hard to produce.

v0.02 - Solid steel cylinder, tapped for rod, cut to different widths to accommodate different sized sockets. Way too hard to produce.

v0.03 - Wood is sustainable, right? Too bulky, looked dumb

v0.03 - Wood is sustainable, right? Too bulky, looked dumb

v0.04 - Back to metal, definitely. Let's cut some stuff up and see what works!

v0.04 - Back to metal, definitely. Let's cut some stuff up and see what works!

v0.05 - Metal bar, tapped at regular intervals, metal sides, with handle.

v0.05 - Metal bar, tapped at regular intervals, metal sides, with handle.

v0.06 - How about a barebones version? Nope. Rope got tangled. Big drop hazard.

v0.06 - How about a barebones version? Nope. Rope got tangled. Big drop hazard.

v0.07 - Ok, let's make it out of aluminum, have hinges, so the handle keeps the sides closed! Sooo close!!

v0.08 - Ok, how about fabric? Oh my. Looks like a purse! Burn it with FIRE!!

v0.08 - Ok, how about fabric? Oh my. Looks like a purse! Burn it with FIRE!!

v0.09 - What we thought would be the production version. All pieces mass producible. Nope. Scratched the heck out of everything, Wasn't portable enough, and loud during vibrational driving. 

v0.09 - What we thought would be the production version. All pieces mass producible. Nope. Scratched the heck out of everything, Wasn't portable enough, and loud during vibrational driving. 

v.10 - Uhhh, hey babe? You know how to sew, right?? BAM. That's it!! Magnets behind the rod, nothing needs to be machined!!

v.10 - Uhhh, hey babe? You know how to sew, right?? BAM. That's it!! Magnets behind the rod, nothing needs to be machined!!

v0.11 - Slightly more professional, tweaked width. Time to go big or go home!

v0.11 - Slightly more professional, tweaked width. Time to go big or go home!

v1.0 - Mmmm, Drool. Look at that stitching!! It's go time!!

v1.0 - Mmmm, Drool. Look at that stitching!! It's go time!!

v1.0 - First production run of 25 units!

v1.0 - First production run of 25 units!

The Guys

We've been friends since 1999, met at work in Phoenix, and consider each other family.

Random stuff we've built/done:

  • Light bar for Jose's FJ, featuring KC DayLighters
  • Rear wheel motorcycle stand
  • Equalateral triangle welding table
  • Mobile workbench with fold away mount for miter saw
  • Sand table for working with kids
  • Mobile bandsaw mount that doubles as a welding cart
  • Metal brake
  • Double gimbal camera mount
  • Truck leaf spring shackles
  • Head gasket on Jose's 99 neon RT

Matt works in Phoenix as a SQL Server developer, doing everything from data transfer, analysis, reporting, and data warehouse design

 
 

 

Jose works in Mesa as an IT Manager, doing everything from server infrastructure to databases to desktops and networking